Home Interesting facts What happened in Iceland on 2017 International Women’s Day?

What happened in Iceland on 2017 International Women’s Day?

On International Women's Day, Iceland became the first country in the world to force companies to prove they pay all employees the same salary. Regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexuality or nationality now Ireland should pay equal salary to all employees.

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The statue is of the first Icelander - Ingolfur Anarsson, and he came to Iceland from , Norway. International Women's Day
Image: The statue is of the first Icelander, Ingolfur Anarsson. He came to Iceland from Norway. Image Source: CNN.com

On International Women’s Day, Iceland became the first country in the world to force companies to prove they pay all employees the same salary. Regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexuality or nationality now Ireland should pay equal salary to all employees.

This new law will be applicable to all the companies that have 25 or more staff. Companies have to get certificate demonstrating pay equality.

Why this decision?

In October 2016, thousands of female employees across various organizations in Iceland walked out of workplaces at 2.38 PM to protest against earning less than men.

But why 2:38 pm?

According to Iceland’s trade unions and women’s organizations, Iceland women are technically working without any pay after 2:38 PM in a typical eight-hour shift.

Here are few facts:

Iceland is ranked number one in the world for gender equality by the World Economic Forum for eight years running. However, as per women and trade organizations, on average Icelandic women still earn 14 to 18 per cent less than men.

Previously Switzerland has come up with the same policy, but Iceland is the first country to make it a mandatory requirement.

Iceland government has taken this decision as part of drive by the Nordic Countries to eradicate the gender pay gap by 2022. Nordic countries consist of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, including their associated territories (Greenland, the Faroe Islands, and the Aland Islands).

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